Noted: New Logo for City of Raleigh by The Assembly

“Digital Leaves”

Raleigh is the capital of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. Raleigh is the second largest city in the state of North Carolina, behind only Charlotte. Raleigh is known as the “City of Oaks” for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 142.8 square miles (370 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city’s population as 451,066 as of July 1, 2015. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the country. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County. Following the establishment of the Research Triangle Park in 1959, numerous jobs were created in science and technology. The region and city have attracted a large influx of population, making it one of the fastest growing communities in the United States by the early 21st century.” (Wikipedia)

Design by
The Assembly (Raleigh, NC)

Related links
City of Raleigh project page
The News & Observer story

Relevant quote
Business Objective: To develop and implement a comprehensive brand platform to help address the City’s communication fragmentation, and build a visual language that balances a modern, collaborative, and forward-thinking organization with our City’s culture and history.

Images (opinion after)

Logo.
Logo presentation.
Brand application exploration

Opinion
This is a new logo for the city government. It does not replace its seal and it’s not a tourism logo. It’s for the city’s communications with its population and to brand city services. We see plenty of destination logos where you could replace the name with that of any other city/country and it would still work but I think this one manages to be relatively specific by capitalizing on a couple of key traits: Raleigh’s oak trees (its nickname is City of Oaks) and Raleigh’s burgeoning tech economy. The two come together effectively into a tree icon, where one half is “organic” and the other is “techie”. I find it quite convincing and, more importantly, it quickly communicates two aspects of the city. The icon is nicely done and balanced; it can probably do without the color gradient. The wordmark is fine but super bland and almost like both designer and client gave up on choosing something more interesting. As usual, for any government project, price is an issue, since it’s taxpayers’ dollars being put to use. The price tag on the logo and identity is a relatively steep $143,000. We all know this covers more than just the logo but even then — for a company that looks to be a co-working space and not an established design firm — this is a big payday so, I guess, good on them. Overall, I think this is an effective logo and one that is appropriate and relevant to Raleigh.

Source:: Brandnew