Reviewed: New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander

“Juice Different”

Established in 2014, Misfit is a product range of cold-pressed juice made from scraps of vegetables and fruits that otherwise go to waste because they are not the right size, shape, or color that, as Misfit says, don’t fit the “high aesthetic standards for produce that is retailed in the US.” They calculate that over 20 billion pounds of fruits and veggies go unharvested or unsold every year in the U.S., so a fraction of that is going into their juices, made in Washington DC and sold in various retail locations in Washington and New York, including Whole Foods. Recently, Misfit introduced a new identity and packaging designed by Brooklyn, NY-based Gander.

We created an identity that challenges beauty standards and glorifies the oddballs. Through illustration, photography and web design, we were able to tell Misfit’s story and educate consumers in a way that was fun and approachable.

Gander provided text


New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander


New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
The misfits.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Logo.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Logo with background illustration.

The old logo was misfit in its own way but it was too mechanical, as if it were representing the machinery used to make the juices instead of the produce that goes into the juices. The super thick “I” with a notch wasn’t particularly inviting either. The new logo is organically misshapen and more convincingly and earnestly conveys the idea of twisted and deformed fruits and vegetables while being much more playful, interesting, and memorable. I love the way the letters interlock, the flipped “i”, and the completely malformed “M”. The logo is actually ugly as hell but it’s one of the few instances where that sentiment is a huge compliment.

The rough, detailed edges of the logo contrast nicely with the abstract illustrations that have smooth curves and lines defining each shape and I like how they keep using the logo in black, which is typically avoided in food packaging altogether.

New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Previous packaging.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
New packaging.

The old packaging helped pave the way for the new one, in a way, with the abstract patterns that were maybe a little too not just out there but confusingly random as to what they represented. The typography throughout was also unappetizing and hard to follow with the shifting alignment. The new packaging is infinitely better while maintaining the same offbeat personality of the original but improving on its aesthetics, hierarchy, and produce-ness. Giving half of the label to the illustrations creates a striking band of color and shapes when the product lines the fridges and allows each juice’s information to then be clearly readable when typeset in the solid blocks of color. It’s a great balance of brand personality and product presentation.

New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander


New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
With misfit produce.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Ad.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Posters.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
T-shirt.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Tote.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Buttons.
New Logo, Identity, and Packaging for Misfit by Gander
Cap.

The identity has a great color palette that’s not too overbearing and the use of black separates its from the jarring-color-on-jarring-color trend of this year. The big, bold complementary font is a good ingredient for the identity in that it’s also kind of fugly on its own but works well as a misfit itself in the applications. The one thing that’s off is the “M” monogram that makes a few appearances (and is their social media avatar) where the smaller size of the “M” loses its rough detail and starts to look just like a kid’s scribble, especially when paired with the extra smooth but wobbly stroke around it that, even if misshapen, feels off-brand. Overall, though, this is a fantastic redesign and one that avoids most recent trends — the illustrations could have easily been that Illustrator-thin-line approach — and gives the product a much more mature and seasoned identity.

Source:: Brandnew